Warmachine Khador Man-O-War Bombardiers photo

By tgn_admin
In Fantasy
Jun 14th, 2011
30 Comments
644 Views

Privateer Press, via Malefic.jp, have posted a photo of painted samples of the Khador plastic Man-O-War Bombardiers.

Man-O-War Bombardiers

Man-O-War Bombardiers

  • Osbad

    Hmm I’m liking them. Initially I was put off by the price, but that is a fun looking unit, and it tempteth me much!

    • Ben Wafer

      $45 for a unit of 5 medium-base infantry isn’t a bad price at all. To get a full unit of 5 metal Man-O-War Shocktroopers or Man-O-War Demolition Corps would cost $84 ($50 for the unit box of 3, then $17 for each additional one to bring it up to full unit size of 5). I love all of the Man-O-War models, so I’m pretty happy that we’re finally getting plastic ones to bring the cost down…

      • arcturus

        A minis game company dropping the price of models when they go to plastic? I think that is actually fairly unprecedented – good job PP.

        • blackfang

          GW does it all the time. It was pretty unprecedented when PP made plastic jacks cost MORE than the same ones in metal.

          • Zac

            The issue with that is that PP doesn’t retroactively raise their prices on products in the manner that GW does. So sometimes kits go for a long time before having a price increase. In addition, the plastic Jack kits include all of the parts to make three Heavy Warjack models and more than a few people have magnetized their kits to get three plastic Jacks from the box.

          • blackfang

            Your first point is very true.
            I can’t give you the second point tho as GW never gets a pass for including extra parts so neither should PP 😛

          • luckyb0y

            To be fair you can do that with plenty of GW kits. Razorback/Predator can be magnetised and used as a Rhino. Dreadnought weapons can be magnetised. Same with Hammer/Ionhead and so on.

          • TylerT

            that was not the point

            the older cheaper metal jacks did not have any extra parts.

            the plastic ones do have extra parts.

            the plastic kits were a value add compared to the cheaper metal kits they replaced.

          • PanzerKraken

            Most of GW’s plastic kits have added value when they changed from metal. Prices went down per model, while also the kits became multi purpose to create multiple units or optional parts which can be swapped out easily as well for many. Price increases happen on a general basis and it does suck, but GW has often lowered prices when switching to plastic while adding alot of extras.

            Course the same can’t be said when switcing to resin 😛

        • Osbad

          I agree the US price isn’t too bad. The problem I have is that with the 20% drop in the £ vs the $ that occurred a couple of years back, WM is that much more expensive over here. It’s not PP’s fault, but its enough to make the models feel expensive. For instance Maelstrom is advertising these at £26.95, which compares with a box of 5 Terminators for 40k at £25.20. Now I already thought the Termies at £5 each were too much for plastic toy soldiers. At 7% more than that, I simply can’t justify the purchase. Now if the exchange rate had been $2/£ it used to be instead of the $1.6/£ it is nowadays, then their price over here would have been probably 20% lower – and made them around £22 a box. Just that little bit less unacceptable for 5 toy soldiers!

          But then, I just an old carmudgeon who believes that if toy soldiers had only increased at the average rate of inflation (the UK RP index since the mid 1980’s has only gone up nearly 250%) then I would be paying something like £1.50 for a model this size (I remember buying Chronicle ogres for 60p each…), not over 5 quid!

          Inflation is one thing, the hyperinflation in the fantasy wargames world is something else entirely!

  • Looking good… I think I’ll be picking these up for sure

  • Shades

    Those models would make great proxies for sci-fi skirmish games, especially for eras between the years 30,000 and 50,000……. 😉

  • oldsalt

    Whoa big shoulders! The poses are much better than the metal ones… but the new supersized, Vlad shoulder pads are bit silly.

    • luckyb0y

      I think (hope more like) it’s just an angle. The regular Man-O-War Shocktroopers have huge shoulder pads as well but, the don’t stick out so much and follow the natural angle of the arms. They look much better this way. I don’t know why PP insists on having this absolutely f..ing massive shoulder pads. It looks silly at puts me off lots of otherwise brilliant models. Is anyone a fan of these?

      • cybogoblin

        I always reasoned that fashion in the Iron Kingdoms was going through an 80’s phase, though I don’t recall seeing any models with leg warmers.

  • Haibane

    Not into Warmachine, but the various Khador Man-O-War troops have always tempted me. I’d probably emphasise the rocket/bomb launcher part of the weapon a little more if I bought them though – looks too much like they’re just toting chainsaws.

  • KelRiever

    This is why I stopped buying anything for Warmachine years ago. It never, ever stops putting too many miniatures that do the same or similar thing out in the market. I know, I know I am in the minority. People want to see more and more new stuff. And I would tend to agree, except I want to see more and more new stuff in new games…not the same game over and over again. Their core rules are still okay-ish and playing with what I already (over-)purchased is still enjoyable. But I do, now, prefer ‘dead’ games like Confrontation so one day, I might actually be able to complete an army and not feel compelled to buy anything else.

    What a concept!

    • luckyb0y

      It’s pretty obvious that Warmachine/Hordes have more in common with Magic: the Gathering than 40k. The game lives and dies by unit synergies. If you want to stay in business, better keep releasing models introducing more synergies alongside. Whether you like it or not that keeps them afloat. I don’t mind at all. You don’t have to get every model, just get the ones you really like. If there are many to choose from then your collection might even make a competitive army.

      • KelRiever

        Well, I don’t know when people decided you had to stay in business by releasing models for the same product, as opposed to make a new game. So I fail to see the logic there, unless people are really scared that they can’t be creative. But um, if a company makes a successful product, I would think they should have the smarts and confidence enough to know that they could make other, entirely new, games.

        • Zac

          Well, I don’t know when people decided you had to stay in business by releasing models for the same product, as opposed to make a new game.

          They are moving popular models to plastic to lower the cost of them. ANd they are clearly coming out with new minis each month but some figures have been very expensive in metal and fans have wanted them in plastic

        • luckyb0y

          I wouldn’t say it’s that simple. Company spends 5+ years developing the product line (rules, minis, fluff etc). Players spend a few years collecting, painting, learning and so on. Both are heavily invested financially and I guess even emotionally. Now the company says: Ok, that will be it. No more minis no more rules. Go play with stuff you already bought or play something else. The result is lots of angry hobbyists who will likely avoid the company in the future and a company that just lost the game that made them successful in the first place. It’s a lose/lose situation. It’s much, much easier to sustain the interest in existing product line than to develop new one. Anyone in the industry will tell you sustaining interest is hard, if not impossible without releasing new minis. It appeals to the hoarder instinct carried over from the ice age and beyond. Gotta catch them all. Seriously I don’t see any harm in new models being released unless it reaches some ridiculous number and you’ll need a proper database to keep track of all the units/stats/rules. I dare say Warmachine is approaching this quicker than any other game I know. But calm down we’re not there yet.

      • Veritas

        See, this is my worry with Warmachine and Hordes. Magic was pretty good for the first couple of sets and then the possible synergies and combinations were so vast and complicated that WotC just couldn’t keep supporting all of the sets in tournament formats. (Plus WotC, unlike PP, retires cards.) Then WotC moved to the more limited tournament formats that only supported current “blocks.” I’m worried that PP is getting near this point where they’re eventually just going to be releasing things to counter unforeseen synergies from the previous book that will, in turn, create unforeseeable synergies.

        • I don’t see that happening… Warmachine introduces 20-30 variants every year where Magic introduced 200 every three months… and when things get out of control it’s time for a new edition. It’s a strong value of miniature games the ‘models never get obsolete’. You might get specific models nerfed, changed or get cooler miniatures but the perceived benefit of being able to use your old models lets you use the selling punch of ‘you are investing’ in models you will be using in 6 years from now.

          • PanzerKraken

            To me what I don’t like that does happen with WM/Hordes is that you get lots of crossover of units/abilities that causes many models to eventually become “retired” in players minds. It happend alot in 1st edition where models were deemed no good and you never saw them get put on the table, and even in MK2 you see players still doing it as even with the rebalancing of everything, many models just shifted in purpose and new models became “useless”. And with adding more and more models to the game, and limited space to build armies, many models happen to get shunted to the side as no longer being competitive as something new and shiny. While they sometimes come up with new unique ways to create synnergy between units, many times you get overlap of roles for models which tends to make players choose which is the superior model for the task.

    • PanzerKraken

      Supporting multiple games is tough, and if you look at game systems that have stayed pretty much the same for years, they tend to not be that big of sellers. Obviously companies have to put out new stuff on a regular basis to keep the player base interested.

      In the same token, new editions of games will always come out to reboot the line and bring in a ton of new money. Games need to be updated at times yes, but money is an obvious big part of it as it’s often used as a new starting point for the game with a ton of new product to sell along with the relaunch. In a couple years, we will surely be seeing MK3 WM/Hordes.

      • KelRiever

        Interesting reads so thanks for the replies. Personally, I think Warmachine hit its limit with me the moment I saw Supremacy. That’s where I lost interest.

        But really, all this is telling me is that we as gamers have pretty low expectations on the abilities of our favorite companies to produce new products, and/or we aren’t really interested in them being that creative. I’m probably saying this in way too negative a way, but the point is that we accept, I guess, the way things are.

        • Veritas

          Well, think about this for a minute. Plenty of companies taking the conservative approach are thriving at the moment. Then you have an example of a company like Rackham. They tossed conservative to the wind and completely rebooted their minis AND systems. Look where Rackham is now.

  • mathieu

    Nice preview. The leader isn’t very different from the rest of the unit though. And I wish PP actually showed us 5 physically different models (even if some are identical sculpts) to get an idea of how poseable they are.

    As usual for PP plastic though, we’ll have to see the actual plastic models to get a feel of how detailed they are, and how clean the casting is. Previews, and in particular resin previews, tend to alleviate these problems of PP plastic models

    • cybogoblin

      That’s my only gripe with PP’s plastic units, they’re not actually that posable. The ‘Jacks aren’t too bad but are still someone limited (unless you cut them).

      As for telling the leader apart, I’m guessing he’s the middle on in the front row. That’s entirely based on him having a spike on his left shoulder pad that none of the others appear to have and nothing else. Something more obvious, like a slightly different helmet, would have been nice.

      • mathieu

        As for telling the leader apart, I’m guessing he’s the middle on in the front row. That’s entirely based on him having a spike on his left shoulder pad that none of the others appear to have and nothing else.

        That and the fact that he’s the only unique model in that picture. The other four are the same two miniatures photographed under different angles.