New FoW articles and spotlights

By tgn_admin
In WWII
Nov 4th, 2010
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The Flames of War website has been update with several new articles and product spotlights

Death on the Hungarian Plains
In WI 277 Blakes and Victor went head to head with a pair of armies based from our new book, Stalin’s Europe. We wont spoil the ending but Blakes M4 76mm lend lease Shermans and SU-100s went head to head with Victors Panzer IV/70(V)s and Zrinyi IIs. For a limited time you can buy the armies that were fielded in the battle report (and get some of these new vehicles before they are officially released) – numbers on both army deals are strictly limited. Orders will ship in a couple of weeks as the deals are currently sailing their way to our local warehouses right now..

Brown Shirts, Thick Skins and Big Balls PzIV/70’s in your Flames Of War game
Now if Wayne had been a real friend he would have given my Feldherrnhale Division Panzerkampgruppe some really cool special rules (He did for the Panzergrenadiers after all). But he told me the Panzer IV/70 was enough of an advantage. Phht what does he know.

Spotlights
Panzer II C (early) (GE010)
Armed with a 2cm main gun that was considered adequate for the time, the Ausf C first appeared in 1937. The Ausf C featured an increase in frontal armour and the five-wheel leaf spring suspension that the Panzerkampfwagen II became famous for.

Panzer IV D (GE040)
The Panzer IV gives fire support to the lighter tanks. Although its role would change as the war progressed, it was the only German tank to stay in continuous production over the course of the war.

StuG A (GE120)
The concept of the Sturmgeschütz (StuG), or assault gun, began in 1936 after a request for an armoured vehicle for the artillery that could provide support for the infantry through direct fire against machine-gun nests and bunkers.

Panzerbefehlswagon x2 (GE003)
The Germans built the Panzerbefehlswagen (pronounced pant-serr be-fails vahgen) command vehcile on the Panzer I chassis. These radio vehicles were the central nervous system for Germany’s armoured blitzkreig spearheads. The Befehlswagen tanks kept tank platoons and companies moving forward during the invasions of Poland and France.

Krupp Kfz 70 truck (GE421, Two Resin Trucks)
The Krupp Kfz 70 truck, commonly known at the Krupp ‘Protze’ was an import vehicle in the German armies of 1939 and 40. This six-wheeled truck was used for transporting the Schützen motorised infantry of the Panzer divisions. It was also used to carry their support weapon and called into action as a gun artillery tractor.

Somua S-35 (FR050)
The Somua S-35 gave excellent service to the French army as a well-armoured medium cavalry tank. The S-35 out performed nearly everything it faced in combat. It was relatively fast, had a powerful gun and was protected by 47mm of front armour.

StuG A (GE120)
The concept of the Sturmgeschütz (StuG), or assault gun, began in 1936 after a request for an armoured vehicle for the artillery that could provide support for the infantry through direct fire against machine-gun nests and bunkers.

A10 Cruiser Mk II (BR022)
The A10 Criser Mk II was developed along side the A9 Cruiser tank. It was designed as an infantry tank, however its armour protection was deemed not sufficient for this role, so it was reclassified as a heavy crusier tank instead. With twice as much armour as the A9, the A10 proved to be a good support tank for the armoured squadrons.

A13 Mk II Cruiser Mk IV (BR025)
The A13 Mk II Cruiser Mk IV was in essence an uparmoured version of the A13 Cruiser Mk III. This increase was mainly added to the frontal armour of the tank; despite the increase in weight due to the extra armour mobility was not affected due to the high power-to-weight ratio of the basic design.

Vickers Light Tank Mk VI B (BR002) with Mk VI C gun option
Vickers Mk VI B light tank was capable of 35 mph (56 km/h) and armed with a water-cooled Vickers .303″ and a Vickers 0.5″ machine-gun the Light Mk VI B was a useful light tank.