July ’10 releases for Infinity

By Grant
In Infinity
Nov 30th, 2010
4 Comments
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Review
by Grant Hill

Several new releases for Infinity were announced by Corvus Belli at the end of July 2010. The company are kind enough to provide us with review samples on a relatively regular basis. The average miniature for the Infinity range tends to have a good level of detail and be well cast, with small mould lines. To avoid repetition across our Infinity reviews, the detail and casting will only be mentioned if the particular miniature is different to the rest of the range. Review samples were sent to us for the following July 2010 releases:

Garuda Tactbots Price: €8.75

Garuda

Garuda

These remote presence robots for the ALEPH faction can deploy via combat jump and this figure is armed with the HMG (heavy machine gun) option. The weapon piece doesn’t seem terribly specific, so it should be easy enough to proxy it as any of the other Garuda options. The figure is provided as nine pieces: body, two legs, two arms, two “wings”, and two pieces of leg armour. There is a definite twist in the body that I initially thought was transit damage, but it’s actually part of the pose. The legs both join to the body at the hips, with a nub and shaped recess. I found that the recess wasn’t quite shaped correctly so I needed to file down the nubs and pin the legs into place. The wings have balls on each side of the shoulder, with one ball socket on the body and one on the arm (so the arms attach to the wings). These areas could also be pinned for added strength. Some care should be taken with the wings as they are quite easily bent in places. The leg armour rests against the front of the lower legs, reminiscent of soccer shin pads.

All of the human sized robots for the ALEPH faction have a similar look, personally I find them a little clunky with some precise parts (the arms wouldn’t look out of place on a much higher tech body). Overall it seems pretty reminiscent of some anime robots that I can’t quite put my finger on, and how much you like anime may decide whether or not you like this sculpt.

Pros:

  • Design choices reflect the background well
  • Can easily proxy for other weapon options

Cons:

  • Misshaped joints needed pinning

Armbots: Peacemaker Price: €24.00

Armbot

Armbot

The Armbots are PanOceania attack remotes that lie somewhere between heavy infantry and TAGs. The Peacemaker is provided in a boxed set (including the usual high gloss, full colour packaging) along with a small Auxbot. The Auxbot has previously been reviewed as part of the Auxilia box set. Briefly, I liked how the design conveys a sense of speed and manoeuvrability, but was worried about damaging the delicate looking fins that are attached to it.

The Armbot is composed of ten pieces: two leg pieces, main hull, left and right hull pieces, rear hull, two sets of ariels, and two small rear fins. All of this fits onto a 40 mm round plastic base. Constructing the hull from the six pieces is pretty straightforward after a bit of dry-fitting, but there is a definite line between the main and rear hull pieces that I would want to fill before painting (although you could leave it for effect). The legs join, and cross, in the centre, so that a single leg piece forms the front left and rear right. The feet of the robot rest on small base extensions that attach to the outer rim of the base, and this requires some care to get everything lined up correctly. The hull joins to the legs via a large ball and socket joint, but I found that parts of the hull foul on the armoured panels at the front of the legs, making the pose look a little akward.

I really like the design of the Armbot, drone-like robots are probably what the Infinity range does best in my opinion. It looks futuristic but probable, and just screams cool to me. Overall I really like this boxed set, but it is spoiled by some niggling construction problems.

Pros:

  • Brilliant drone robot design

Cons:

  • Some construction problems

Moblots Price: €7.75

Moblot

Moblot

The Moblots are heavy infantry for the Ariadna faction. This figure is armed with a rifle and panzerfaust, and its stats are included in the original Infinity rulebook (most of the recent releases have been from the Human Sphere expansion). The figure is provided in three pieces: body, right arm with panzerfaust, and left arm. Although both the rules and packaging mention that this figure is armed with a rifle, no rifle piece is provided and this is probably an aesthetic decision (I’m not sure where it would go). The arms both join at the shoulders with ball and sockets. These joints then contain an additional ball and socket (there’s a small ball within the larger socket and vice versa). While this makes construction easy, it does restrict the positioning of the arms.

Ariadna are a low-tech option compared to the other Infinity forces, and this figure reflects that well – the design of the armour and fatigues wouldn’t look out of place in a near-modern game. Compared to other heavy infantry in the game this figure doesn’t look that well protected, armour is mainly restricted to a large chest panel that fits the obviously female form. This is in reference to the background information of Ariadna having access to a material that is very dense but also light. The pose isn’t static, but it looks like a moment in time when the Moblot is in cover and approaching the enemy, with the panzerfaust pointing towards the ground. Personally, while there is nothing wrong with the figure, I don’t find anything particularly inspiring about it either – I’d be more likely to buy it for its in-game abilities rather than the aesthetics of the figure.

Pros:

  • Well thought out joints make assembly easy

Cons:

  • Perhaps a figure I would own for its ability, rather than look

Sin-Eater Observants Price: €7.75

Sin-Eater

Sin-Eater

The Sin-Eater Observants are protectors of a religious sect within the Nomad faction. This is the first Sin-Eater to be released and is armed with a sniper rifle. The kit comes in four pieces: legs, body, left arm, and right arm with rifle. The body joins at the hips as though the Sin-Eater has been chopped in half, but the join is hidden nicely by a belt at the front and a cloak at the back. The left shoulder is a big deep-v shape that is filled by the top of the left arm. This means that the arm is very easy to get into the correct position, but when I assembled the review sample there was a gap running around the resulting joint that I needed to fill with green stuff. The right arm joins at the shoulder with a nub and socket that is well defined. Again this eases construction, but restricts the pose unless you’ve got some conversion skills.

The figure is posed as though taking a large purposeful step forward with the sniper rifle resting on his shoulder, pointing up and behind him. His cloak is billowing out behind him and overall I find the pose very cool. Combining the pose with the design of the armour/clothing/equipment makes this figure one of my favourites and I can see myself using it more generically, perhaps in RPGs as well as miniatures games. The purposeful step of the pose is explained in the game’s background as the Sin-Eater has been “augmented” with implants that means he can react to enemy fire quickly, but this can cause long term nerve damage and hence they control their actions carefully. Much of the Infinity range is posed in very dynamic poses, meaning this figure could look a little out of place on the tabletop. Conversely, it also means that the figure may fit in better with other those from other manufacturers.

Pros:

  • The pose and design really appeal to this reviewer

Cons:

  • Gaps need filling around the left arm join, slowing assembly