Iron Box Games cancels Angry Sheep, but the game will live on

By Polar_Bear
In Crowdfunding
Aug 12th, 2013
11 Comments
422 Views

Iron Box Games cancelled their campaign on Kickstarter to fund Angry Sheep, but this doesn’t mean the game won’t be made.

From the update:

I contacted the factory yesterday and told them to begin the production process. Our quote says that the product should ship in 80 days, but counting it as 90 days that puts us at the top of November for delivery to the warehouse. This will give us plenty of time to get orders shipped in time for Christmas.

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  • blkdymnd

    So, this is what irks me. I’m reading the comments, and I’m guessing it wasn’t going to fund? In that case, you’re going with production anyway, why did you even need Kickstarter?? I’m just starting to tire of companies that don’t need a project actually crowdfunded still having to use Kickstarter.

  • kelmor

    You understand that kickstarter takes away risk. Why is it people desperately want companies to risk when they have a perfectly acceptable option to not do that?

    There is and cannot be anything wrong with looking to crowd funding as an option for anyone.

    I really do not understand the, put plainly, the arrogance to deem that this company or that company did not “need” to use X

    When someone starts deciding what other people are allowed to need, bad things happen.

    • Bewulf

      But crowdfunding does not take away risks, it just shifts them to the backers.

      So one could also ask: Why is it companies desperately want peoples to risk when they have a perfectly acceptable option to not do that?

      The answer to your question and mine is the same: Nobody likes to risks their own money and prefers others to risk their money for them.

      • But crowdfunding does not take away risks, it just shifts them to the backers.

        Which still takes it away form the producer 🙂 That was the original point.

        Why is it companies desperately want peoples to risk when they have a perfectly acceptable option to not do that?

        That is one way of looking at it. Another way to look at it is that it also locks buyers in to a purchased to ensure that the funding is ultimately available.

        if 100 people say they are going to buy a product and then four months later you have it in hand you have to hope that those people are still willing to pay.

        Kickstarter locks those people in. If they want to see a product then they pay for it and the producer is guaranteed those funds.

        • Bewulf

          Which still takes it away form the
          producer 🙂 That was the original
          point.

          Oh, I know that. I just wanted to illustrate why people might not want companies using crowdfunding.

          Personally I also like to seperate companies that “need” crowdfunding to get stuff done from companies that do not need crowdfunding, but use it because it is in their best interest.
          An example of this is CMON, which certainly do not need Kickstarter to get their games out, but would be stupid not to use it.

          it also locks buyers in to a purchased
          to ensure that the funding is
          ultimately available.

          That certainly is an important point. IIRC Chern Ann Ng from CMON said that grabbing the attention of gamers and then getting them to spend money for the short duration that you have it is vital in the hobby market.

          • grimbergen

            And the standard response to CMON not needing the money… where do you have that info from? Just because they’ve had a few KS hits the past year doesn’t make them a mega publisher. Unless you have info that their retail sales are putting them in the same league as a true small publisher like GMT?

            “…grabbing the attention of gamers and then getting them to spend money for the short duration that you have it is vital…”

            That’s vital in any market — movies, tv, video games — these days, so he’s only keeping up with the times.

          • Bewulf

            And the standard response to CMON not
            needing the money… where do you have
            that info from?

            Haven’t we been there before? But I will repost my arguments again if it helps, but let me set a few things straight first to avoid misunderstandings.

            I never said anything about “needing money”. All projects need money. I was only talking about needing crowdfunding to get games out.
            When saying “needing crowdfunding” in this discussion I mean having no other options for getting games out.
            I am not debating whether or not CMON “should” be using crowdfunding, this is purely about the need.

            With that out of the way let us continue.

            Why does CMON not need crowdfunding?
            Well, for starters they set their funding goals at less than 10% of actual production cost (info from interviews with Chern Ann Ng). This means if push comes to shove they are willing and ready to pay over 90% of the money needed to make the game a reality out of their own pockets. And if they already have access to over at least 90% of the money needed for a project it is hard to believe that crowdfunding is their only option of gathering those remaining less than 10%.

            CMON has gathered nearly 6 (5,95 to be exact) million dollars with 7 projects on Kickstarter. If we do exclude their smallest project, Guilds of Cadwallon, we are still at nearly 6 (5,84) million dollars with 6 projects. With half a dozen million dollar projects and following retail sales they do not have made the few thousand dollars (funding goal of 25K for each of their last 3 projects, 5K for Guilds of Cadwallon) to make one of their games a reality without needing to use crowdfunding? Again hard to believe.

            Even if they have not made that small profit I have to ask if you think that Zombicide Season 2 would not have succeeded as a preorder or even normal retail release?
            Again, at this point I must stress that I am not saying they should not use crowdfunding. Using crowdfunding is in their best interest and will certainly get them more money than other options, but in this case, bringing out the sequel/add-on to a highly popular game, was crowdfunding really their only option?

          • Ghool

            I think they’re using Kickstarter more as a marketing platform.
            That’s why the goals are set so low, and they add on lots of freebies.

            For CMON it seems it’s more an advertising and marketing tool/platform versus a funding platform. I honestly doubt they need the crowd funding, but it does advertise the product well with virtually no information on said product.

  • I believe that Kelmor has the gist of it. If you can bring a game to market and lock in sales as well as provide funds up front for production why would you not take advantage of that opportunity?

  • Gallahad

    What I find most puzzling is that despite an unsuccessful Kickstarter, they are still going to take out the loan to publish the game. An unsuccessful KS is about as good of a poll of customer opinion/market demand as you are going to get. Maybe they are just convinced that if more people saw it/knew about it they would buy it or something?

    • grimbergen

      I have no interest in this product, but specifically to your point, I don’t see how an unsuccessful KS campaign translates to a product that won’t sell.

      Not everyone is a KS pro, and there are many intricacies about when/what/how you structure the campaign, not to mention asking for funding in a few weeks rather than say, waiting a year or more to sell out in retail.

      Add to that this is technically a presale and many people won’t buy anything until it’s physically available.

      Then you also have to contend with the many KS-haters who will never back a project for the principle of crowdfunding that would normally buy (or even preorder) the game.